Training the Arm and Hand After Stroke Using Auditory Rhythm Cues

Completed

Phase 1/2 Results N/A

Trial Description

The purpose of this study is to determine whether or not having people with stroke practice performing tasks to auditory rhythm cues with their weaker arm and hand is any better at promoting improved motor control than practicing the tasks in a typical way without the rhythm cues

Detailed Description

Stroke is the leading cause of adult-onset disability in the United States, and 75% of those presenting with UE deficits continue to have decreased UE function, despite rehabilitation. Despite demonstrated efficacy that functional task practice promotes improved UE function post-stroke,4-6 most subjects continue to have substantial disability, reporting less paretic hand use than pre-stroke and having lower scores on motor tests. Auditory rhythm entrainment of functional task practice may enhance therapy efficacy by facilitating the adoption of more normal movement patterns. Thus, it is critical to public health that more effective approaches to facilitate UE motor recovery are developed. This study would further the mission of NCMRR to enhance independence of persons with disability and that of NICHD: "optimal well-being of all people through rehabilitation."
The primary aim of this pilot study is to gather preliminary data on the impact of auditory rhythm entrainment of functional task practice (FTARC) on improvement in UE function compared to functional task practice alone (FTP) in subjects with moderate hemiparesis from chronic stroke. Our primary hypothesis is that after FTARC, subjects will demonstrate greater gains in UE function compared to persons in the FTP group. Secondary aims are to understand 1) the relative impact of FTARC on retention of motor skills 6 months after therapy and 2) to understand how changes in more underlying elemental components of UE movement, (kinetic parameters and multi-joint synergies) relate to this improvement in outcome. Our secondary hypotheses are that the subjects with FTARC will demonstrate movement composition that is closer to that of neurologically intact individuals and greater retention of functional gains compared to subjects with FTP.
This study will use a prospective, parallel group design in which subjects, after baseline testing, will be adaptively randomized by UE motor severity into either the FTARC or the FTP groups. Therapy will be 4 hours of task practice per weekday for 2 weeks. Subjects will wear a mitt on their non-paretic hand for 90% of waking hours. Subjects will then complete post-intervention and 6-month follow up testing.

Conditions

Interventions

  • Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy + auditory rhythm cues Behavioral
    Other Names: Functional task practice, Forced use
    Intervention Desc: The intervention is functional task practice with the paretic arm and hand for 4 hours/day for 10 sessions over 2 weeks plus a home program for the intervening weekend. Participants in the experimental group will perform this practice to the beat of a metronome. All participants will also wear a mitt on the less affected hand for up to 90% of waking hours.
    ARM 1: Kind: Experimental
    Label: A
    Description: This group will complete a 2 week program of functional task practice with auditory rhythm cuing.
  • Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy Procedure
    Intervention Desc: The intervention is functional task practice with the paretic arm and hand for 4 hours/day for 10 sessions over 2 weeks plus a home program for the intervening weekend. All participants will also wear a mitt on the less affected hand for up to 90% of waking hours.
    ARM 1: Kind: Experimental
    Label: F
    Description: This group will complete a 2 week program of functional task practice without auditory rhythm cuing.

Trial Design

  • Allocation: Randomized
  • Masking: Single Blind (Outcomes Assessor)
  • Purpose: Treatment
  • Endpoint: Efficacy Study
  • Intervention: Parallel Assignment

Outcomes

Type Measure Time Frame Safety Issue
Primary Improved motor control as measured by increased scores on both the upper extremity subtest of the Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment and the Wolf Motor Function Test At 2 weeks, at 3 months, and at 6 months No
Secondary Improved spatial-temporal movement patterns measured by 3-D motion analysis, improved force control measured by isometric and dynamic force production tasks, and increased paretic arm use measured by increased scores on the Motor Activity Log At 2 weeks, 3 months and 6 months No

Sponsors