The Role of Auditory Feedback in Guiding Upper Extremity Movements

Not yet recruiting

Phase N/A Results N/A

Trial Description

Stroke is one of the leading causes of disability, with an estimated prevalence of 50,000 cases per year in Canada. Less than half of stroke patients regain use of their arm and hand. There is currently no intervention regime that is the gold standard, despite the variety of therapeutic techniques used to treat the upper extremity post-stroke. The use of external feedback to improve motor learning is a technique that has been less studied but shows promise. Therefore, the purpose of this proof of principle study it to test whether different auditory feedback frequencies can facilitate reaching ability in people with stroke. In addition brain scans will be collected that will enable us to determine how stroke severity may impact on one's ability to improve with this technique.
We hypothesize that patients who receive less feedback (50% alternate) will have enhanced learning relative to the patients who receive more feedback (100%).

Conditions

Interventions

  • Auditory Feedback 100% Behavioral
    Intervention Desc: Patients will receive constant auditory feedback across training trials.
    ARM 1: Kind: Experimental
    Label: Patients
    Description: Patients will receive: Auditory Feedback 100% Auditory Feedback 50% alternate
  • Auditory Feedback 50% alternate Behavioral
    Intervention Desc: Patients will receive alternating auditory feedback (1 trial auditory feedback; 1 trial no auditory feedback) across trials
    ARM 1: Kind: Experimental
    Label: Patients
    Description: Patients will receive: Auditory Feedback 100% Auditory Feedback 50% alternate

Trial Design

  • Masking: Open Label
  • Purpose: Basic Science
  • Intervention: Single Group Assignment

Outcomes

Type Measure Time Frame Safety Issue
Primary Change in movement error from baseline participants will be followed for the duration of the study, an expected 3 hours per day for 2 weeks (5 days per week/10 days total) No
Secondary Change in range of motion participants will be followed for the duration of the study, an expected 3 hours per day for 2 weeks (5 days per week/10 days total) No
Secondary Change in movement duration participants will be followed for the duration of the study, an expected 3 hours per day for 2 weeks (5 days per week/10 days total) No

Sponsors