Tailored Approaches to Stroke Health Education "TASHE"

Active, not recruiting

Phase N/A Results N/A

Update History

31 Jan '18
The Summary of Purpose was updated.
New
Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability and costs U.S. taxpayers >$60 billion annually. Interventions designed to educate patients to seek treatment sooner when a stroke occurs may increase low rates of treatment with thrombolysis (current rates 3% national average). Thrombolysis can increase the odds of minimal to zero disability from stroke if emergency medical system response times and in-hospital response times are optimized (maximum time from symptom onset to intravenous thrombolysis is 4.5 hours). Black and Hispanic Americans have higher stroke incidence compared to Whites and are less likely to receive thrombolysis for acute stroke. The latency to hospital arrival is largely dependent on patients'recognition of stroke symptoms, and immediate presentation to the emergency department. Our group has found very low stroke literacy rates among Blacks and Hispanics compared to Whites, which may, in part, be responsible for disparities in acute stroke treatment. Building on our previous work, in which the investigators have identified barriers to increasing stroke literacy and behavioral intent to call 911, the investigators will develop and evaluate the effectiveness of a novel, culturally tailored intervention using storytelling (narrative persuasion) in the form of two professionally produced 12-min films (in English and Spanish), in minority populations in New York City. The investigators hypothesize that participants in the intervention arm (who view the stroke education film) will demonstrate greater behavioral intent to call 911 for suspected stroke compared to those in the usual care arm, who will receive written stroke education materials. Behavioral intent to call 911 will be assessed immediately after viewing the film, 6 months later, and one year later.
Old
Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability and costs U.S. taxpayers >$60 billion annually. Interventions designed to educate patients to seek treatment sooner when a stroke occurs may increase low rates of treatment with thrombolysis (current rates 3% national average). Thrombolysis can increase the odds of minimal to zero disability from stroke if emergency medical system response times and in-hospital response times are optimized (maximum time from symptom onset to intravenous thrombolysis is 4.5 hours). Black and Hispanic Americans have higher stroke incidence compared to Whites and are less likely to receive thrombolysis for acute stroke. The latency to hospital arrival is largely dependent on patients'recognition of stroke symptoms, and immediate presentation to the emergency department. Our group has found very low stroke literacy rates among Blacks and Hispanics compared to Whites, which may, in part, be responsible for disparities in acute stroke treatment. Building on our previous work, in which the investigators have identified barriers to increasing stroke literacy and behavioral intent to call 911, the investigators will develop and evaluate the effectiveness of a novel, culturally tailored intervention using storytelling (narrative persuasion) in the form of two professionally produced 12-min films (in English and Spanish), in minority populations in New York City. The investigators hypothesize that participants in the intervention arm (who view the stroke education film) will demonstrate greater behavioral intent to call 911 for suspected stroke compared to those in the usual care arm, who will receive written stroke education materials. Behavioral intent to call 911 will be assessed immediately after viewing the film, 6 months later, and one year later.
The gender criteria for eligibility was updated to "All."
14 Nov '13
A location was updated in New York City.
New
The overall status was removed for Columbia University Medical Center, Neurological Institute.