Stroke Gait Rehabilitation Using Functional Electrical Stimulation

Recruiting

Phase N/A Results N/A

Update History

2 Aug '17
The Summary of Purpose was updated.
New
Stroke is the number one cause of disability. Difficulty with walking affects most stroke survivors. The focus of this project is to understand the effects of different methods (such as treadmill walking and electrical stimulation) that can be used to improve walking in people with stroke. In this study, patients with stroke and healthy people who have not had a stroke will be tested. Study participants will take part in walking evaluation and training sessions. Walking patterns will be measured using automatic cameras and standard clinical tests. Also, magnetic brain stimulation maybe used to measure brain-muscle connections, and muscle stimulation may be used to measure spinal-cord circuits during the training. This research will provide information on how different factors that affect walking in stroke change with walking training. The investigators hypothesize that improvements in brain excitability of the muscles targeted by walking training will occur after training, and these changes in brain excitability will be related to improvements in walking patterns. By improving our understanding of walking rehabilitation, this study can help improve walking function and disability in people with stroke.
Old
Stroke is the number one cause of disability. Difficulty with walking affects most stroke survivors. The focus of this project is to understand the effects of different methods (such as treadmill walking and electrical stimulation) that can be used to improve walking in people with stroke. In this study, patients with stroke and healthy people who have not had a stroke will be tested. Study participants will take part in 18 sessions of walking training. Walking patterns will be measured using automatic cameras and standard clinical tests. Also, magnetic brain stimulation maybe used to measure brain-muscle connections, and muscle stimulation may be used to measure spinal-cord circuits during the training. This research will provide information on how different factors that affect walking in stroke change with walking training. The investigators hypothesize that improvements in brain excitability of the muscles targeted by walking training will occur after training, and these changes in brain excitability will be related to improvements in walking patterns. By improving our understanding of walking rehabilitation, this study can help improve walking function and disability in people with stroke.
The gender criteria for eligibility was updated to "All."
2 Aug '16
A location was updated in Atlanta.
New
The overall status was updated to "Recruiting" at Emory University.
15 Jul '15
A location was updated in Atlanta.
New
The overall status was updated to "Recruiting" at Emory University.
10 Dec '14
The Summary of Purpose was updated.
New
Stroke is the number one cause of disability. Difficulty with walking affects most stroke survivors. The focus of this project is to understand the effects of different methods (such as treadmill walking and electrical stimulation) that can be used to improve walking in people with stroke. In this study, patients with stroke and healthy people who have not had a stroke will be tested. Study participants will take part in 18 sessions of walking training. Walking patterns will be measured using automatic cameras and standard clinical tests. Also, magnetic brain stimulation maybe used to measure brain-muscle connections, and muscle stimulation may be used to measure spinal-cord circuits during the training. This research will provide information on how different factors that affect walking in stroke change with walking training. The investigators hypothesize that improvements in brain excitability of the muscles targeted by walking training will occur after training, and these changes in brain excitability will be related to improvements in walking patterns. By improving our understanding of walking rehabilitation, this study can help improve walking function and disability in people with stroke.
Old
Stroke is the number one cause of disability. Difficulty with walking affects most stroke survivors. The focus of this project is to understand the effects of different methods (such as treadmill walking and electrical stimulation) that can be used to improve walking in people with stroke. In this study, patients with stroke and healthy people who have not had a stroke will be tested. Study participants will take part in 12 sessions of walking training. Walking patterns will be measured using automatic cameras and standard clinical tests. Also, magnetic brain stimulation maybe used to measure brain-muscle connections during the training. This research will provide information on how different factors that affect walking in stroke change with walking training. The investigators hypothesize that improvements in brain excitability of the muscles targeted by walking training will occur after training, and these changes in brain excitability will be related to improvements in walking patterns. By improving our understanding of walking rehabilitation, this study can help improve walking function and disability in people with stroke.
30 Apr '14
The Summary of Purpose was updated.
New
Stroke is the number one cause of disability. Difficulty with walking affects most stroke survivors. The focus of this project is to understand the effects of different methods (such as treadmill walking and electrical stimulation) that can be used to improve walking in people with stroke. In this study, patients with stroke and healthy people who have not had a stroke will be tested. Study participants will take part in 12 sessions of walking training. Walking patterns will be measured using automatic cameras and standard clinical tests. Also, magnetic brain stimulation maybe used to measure brain-muscle connections during the training. This research will provide information on how different factors that affect walking in stroke change with walking training. The investigators hypothesize that improvements in brain excitability of the muscles targeted by walking training will occur after training, and these changes in brain excitability will be related to improvements in walking patterns. By improving our understanding of walking rehabilitation, this study can help improve walking function and disability in people with stroke.
Old
Stroke is the number one cause of disability. Difficulty with walking affects most stroke survivors. The focus of this project is to understand the effects of different methods (such as treadmill walking and electrical stimulation) that can be used to improve walking in people with stroke. In this study, patients with stroke and healthy people who have not had a stroke will be tested. Study participants will take part in 12 sessions of walking training. Walking patterns will be measured using automatic cameras and standard clinical tests. Also, magnetic brain stimulation will be used to measure brain-muscle connections at every session. This research will provide information on how different factors that affect walking in stroke change with walking training. The investigators hypothesize that improvements in brain excitability of the muscles targeted by walking training will occur after training, and these changes in brain excitability will be related to improvements in walking patterns. By improving our understanding of walking rehabilitation, this study can help improve walking function and disability in people with stroke.
The eligibility criteria were updated.
New
Inclusion Criteria: - Chronic stroke (>6 months post stroke) - First (single) lesion - Able to walk with or without the use of a cane or walker - Sufficient cardiovascular health and ankle stability to walk for 6 minutes at a self-selected speed without an orthoses - Resting heart rate 40-100 beats per minute Exclusion Criteria: - Evidence of moderate/ severe chronic white matter disease or cerebellar stroke on MRI - Cerebellar signs (ataxic ("drunken") gait or decreased coordination during rapid alternating hand or foot movements - Insulin dependent diabetes - History of lower extremity joint replacement - Score of >1 on question 1b and >0 on question 1c on NIH Stroke Scale - Inability to communicate with investigators - Neglect/hemianopia, or unexplained dizziness in last 6 months - Neurologic conditions other than stroke - Orthopedic problems in the lower limbs/spine or other problems that limit walking - Contra-indications to Transcranial magnetic stimulation (history of seizures, metal implants in the head, presence of skull fractures, etc).
Old
Inclusion Criteria: - Chronic stroke (>6 months post stroke) involving cerebral cortical regions - First (single) lesion - Able to walk with or without the use of a cane or walker - Sufficient cardiovascular health and ankle stability to walk for 6 minutes at a self-selected speed without an orthoses - Resting heart rate 40-100 beats per minute Exclusion Criteria: - Evidence of moderate/ severe chronic white matter disease or cerebellar stroke on MRI - Cerebellar signs (ataxic ("drunken") gait or decreased coordination during rapid alternating hand or foot movements - Insulin dependent diabetes - History of lower extremity joint replacement - Score of >1 on question 1b and >0 on question 1c on NIH Stroke Scale - Inability to communicate with investigators - Neglect/hemianopia, or unexplained dizziness in last 6 months - Neurologic conditions other than stroke - Orthopedic problems in the lower limbs or spine that limit walking - Contra-indications to Transcranial magnetic stimulation (history of seizures, metal implants in the head, presence of skull fractures, etc).