Sex Differences in Vascular Markers of Stroke Risk "SAVVY"

Completed

Phase N/A Results N/A

Update History

10 Nov '17
The description was updated.
New
Men and women with stroke have different risk factor profiles. Women tend to develop stroke risk factors, subclinical disease, and have vascular events following menopause, presumably related to the depletion of estrogen. Men, however, tend to develop vascular disease at a younger age. Sex differences in subclinical disease are poorly understood. Identification of subclinical disease could lead to more aggressive interventions to prevent stroke and other vascular events. The objectives of this study are to quantify and compare vascular function in men and women by measuring carotid atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction, and ankle-brachial index and then to determine the effect of age, race-ethnicity, cardiovascular risk factors, biological markers and hormonal markers on these vascular measures to determine gender-specific models. The aims of this project are to determine if middle-aged men and women at risk for stroke have differences in functional and structural vascular assessments, and to develop comprehensive vascular health profiles in men and women. In this trial, researchers will use a cross-sectional design to study gender differences in vascular functions and other vascular risk factors in 150 women and 100 men with 1 or more cardiovascular risk factors but without evidence of stroke, heart disease, or peripheral vascular disease. Participants will be divided in two age groups: 45 to 54 and 55 to 64 and will be followed for two years for vascular outcomes, such as stroke, transient ischemic attack or TIA, or acute coronary syndromes. Information from this study will help develop a comprehensive gender-specific model of subclinical disease, discover novel biological and vascular markers for stroke, and provide critical data to be used in future studies aimed at slowing progression of vascular dysfunction and preventing stroke.
Old
Men and women with stroke have different risk factor profiles. Women tend to develop stroke risk factors, subclinical disease, and have vascular events following menopause, presumably related to the depletion of estrogen. Men, however, tend to develop vascular disease at a younger age. Sex differences in subclinical disease are poorly understood. Identification of subclinical disease could lead to more aggressive interventions to prevent stroke and other vascular events. The objectives of this study are to quantify and compare vascular function in men and women by measuring carotid atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction, and ankle-brachial index and then to determine the effect of age, race-ethnicity, cardiovascular risk factors, biological markers and hormonal markers on these vascular measures to determine gender-specific models. The aims of this project are to determine if middle-aged men and women at risk for stroke have differences in functional and structural vascular assessments, and to develop comprehensive vascular health profiles in men and women. In this trial, researchers will use a cross-sectional design to study gender differences in vascular functions and other vascular risk factors in 150 women and 100 men with 1 or more cardiovascular risk factors but without evidence of stroke, heart disease, or peripheral vascular disease. Participants will be divided in two age groups: 45 to 54 and 55 to 64 and will be followed for two years for vascular outcomes, such as stroke, transient ischemic attack or TIA, or acute coronary syndromes. Information from this study will help develop a comprehensive gender-specific model of subclinical disease, discover novel biological and vascular markers for stroke, and provide critical data to be used in future studies aimed at slowing progression of vascular dysfunction and preventing stroke.
The gender criteria for eligibility was updated to "All."
13 Dec '14
A location was updated in Winston-Salem.
New
The overall status was removed for Wake Forest University Health Sciences.