Role of Ipsilateral Motor Cortex in Executing Movements With Increasing Demand on Precision "RIMC"

Active, not recruiting

Phase N/A Results N/A

Trial Description

It is well known that the motor area of one hemisphere of the brain (motor cortex) controls the movement of the opposite of the body. However, it is not clear whether as the movement becomes more complicated, the motor cortex of both hemispheres of the brain are involved. Currently the role of the motor cortex on the same side of the body (referred to as ipsilateral motor cortex) in hand performance remains controversial. The investigators demonstrated previously in healthy subjects that transiently lowering the activity of ipsilateral motor cortex improved the performance of the opposite hand. What is not know are the mechanisms involved in these changes of behavior. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a device that allows the non- invasive stimulation of the brain. When brain is stimulated repetitively at a very low rate and low intensity for about 15 minutes, the stimulated brain area becomes less active. This effect lasts 10 minutes and is called a "transient artificial lesion" as it mimicks the effects of transiently interfering with the function of the stimulated brain area. In the present study the investigators will conduct experiments using repetitive TMS to downregulate the activity of the motor area as in previous experiments and measures its effect on activity of motor cortex of both hemispheres. The investigators will study healthy subjects. It would be important to understand the effects in more detail for the design of treatment strategies in patients after stroke, which will be a topic of future studies.

Conditions

Trial Design

  • Observation: Case Control
  • Perspective: Prospective
  • Sampling: Non-Probability Sample

Trial Population

30 Stroke patients with 15 in each group based on location of stroke 50 healthy volunteers

Outcomes

Type Measure Time Frame Safety Issue
Primary Define key parameters that contribute to contralesional M1 reorganization following stroke Up to six months post-stroke No

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