Prevent Return of Stroke Study

Completed

Phase N/A Results

Update History

11 May '12
A location was updated in New York.
New
The overall status was removed for Mount Sinai School of Medicine.
6 Oct '11
The description was updated.
New
Twenty nine percent of the 700,000 strokes that occur yearly nationwide are among stroke survivors. Blacks, both nationally and among Harlem residents, have a twofold increase in recurrent strokes. Harlem Latinos have a threefold increase in risk relative to Whites. Primary risk factors for recurrent stroke include hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and under use of anti-thrombotic agents. Controlling risk factors can be particularly challenging for low-income, minority populations who lack the resources needed to adhere to necessary therapies. In Harlem, 72% of adults studied six months post stroke did not have these three risk factors treated adequately. We propose to determine if participation in a recurrent stroke prevention educational intervention, versus usual care, can activated stroke survivors to at reduce primary risk factors for recurrent strokes while providing an effective, low-cost, sustainable recurrent stroke prevention program in neighborhoods like Harlem, whose residents bear a disproportionate burden of suffering from strokes. Specifically, we propose: 1. Recruit 600 adults who sustained a stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) within the past five years by working with Harlem community leaders, local clinical sites including the Mount Sinai Medical Center and the Institute for Family Health, and the Visiting Nurse Service of New York; 2. To conduct a randomized, controlled trial to determine if participation in a peer-led stroke prevention program activates stroke and TIA survivors to improve their knowledge and self-management strategies and treatments related to stroke prevention; and 3. To rigorously compare the impact of the intervention with usual care (delayed intervention), on increasing the proportion of individuals with strokes and TIAs who are appropriately treated to reduce the risk of recurrent events, specifically through control of hypertension (blood pressure ≤ 140/90mmHg), hyperlipidemia (LDL cholesterol≤100 mg/dl) and use of anti-thrombotic medicines.
Old
Twenty nine percent of the 700,000 strokes that occur yearly nationwide are among stroke survivors. Blacks, both nationally and among Harlem residents, have a twofold increase in recurrent strokes. Harlem Latinos have a threefold increase in risk relative to Whites. Primary risk factors for recurrent stroke include hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and under use of anti-thrombotic agents. Controlling risk factors can be particularly challenging for low-income, minority populations who lack the resources needed to adhere to necessary therapies. In Harlem, 72% of adults studied six months post stroke did not have these three risk factors treated adequately. We propose to determine if participation in a recurrent stroke prevention educational intervention, versus usual care, can activated stroke survivors to at reduce primary risk factors for recurrent strokes while providing an effective, low-cost, sustainable recurrent stroke prevention program in neighborhoods like Harlem, whose residents bear a disproportionate burden of suffering from strokes. Specifically, we propose: 1. Recruit 600 adults who sustained a stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) within the past five years by working with Harlem community leaders, local clinical sites including the Mount Sinai Medical Center and the Institute for Family Health, and the Visiting Nurse Service of New York; 2. To conduct a randomized, controlled trial to determine if participation in a peer-led stroke prevention program activates stroke and TIA survivors to improve their knowledge and self-management strategies and treatments related to stroke prevention; and 3. To rigorously compare the impact of the intervention with usual care (delayed intervention), on increasing the proportion of individuals with strokes and TIAs who are appropriately treated to reduce the risk of recurrent events, specifically through control of hypertension (blood pressure ? 140/90mmHg), hyperlipidemia (LDL cholesterol?100 mg/dl) and use of anti-thrombotic medicines.