Post Stroke Hand Functions: Bilateral Movements and Electrical Stimulation Treatments

Completed

Phase 2 Results

Update History

15 May '12
Trial name was updated.
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Post Stroke Hand Functions: Bilateral Movements and Electrical Stimulation Treatments
The Summary of Purpose was updated.
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The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of two amounts of treatment therapy on post stroke motor recovery in the arms. The therapy is bilateral movement training combined with electrical stimulation on the impaired limb.
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The purpose of this study is to compare how well providing 2 different amounts of therapy, electrical stimulation to the arm/hand muscles plus bilateral practice using the arms/hands, for the weaker arm and hand after stroke facilitates arm and hand function.
The description was updated.
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Intense movement training (practice) with the affected arm after stroke has the potential to improve upper extremity (UE) function resulting from neuroplasticity changes in the motor cortex. However, the necessary and sufficient parameters of this therapy in humans have not been fully investigated. Delineation of the most efficacious and efficient therapy for promoting UE recovery post-stroke is necessary before effective clinical implementation of this therapy. The current compared the effects on motor function impairments for three bilateral movement groups involving two doses of treatment (i.e., bilateral training coupled with neuromuscular electrical stimulation) and a sham control. During the subacute recovery phase (3 - 6 months), patients who meet motor capabilities criteria will be randomly assigned to one of three groups: (a) low intensity: 90 minutes/session, 2 sessions/week 2 weeks; bilateral movement training coupled with active neuromuscular stimulation on the impaired wrist/fingers; (b) high intensity: 90 minutes/session, 4 sessions/week for 2 weeks; bilateral movement training coupled with active stimulation on the impaired wrist/finger extensors; and (c) control group (sham active stimulation). Patients' UE motor capabilities were assessed before treatment therapy began (pretest) and within the first week after the treatment therapy ended (posttest).
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"Intense skill practice with the affected arm after stroke has the potential to improve upper extremity (UE) function resulting from neuroplastic changes in the motor cortex. However, the necessary and sufficient parameters of this therapy in humans have not been fully investigated. Delineation of the most efficacious and efficient therapy for promoting UE recovery post-stroke is necessary before effective clinical implementation of this therapy. In this study, using parallel group design methodology, we will compare the effects on motor function of 2 doses of neuromuscular electric stimulation coupled with bilateral motor practice. During the subacute recovery phase (3 - 6 months), patients who meet motor capabilities criteria will be randomly assigned to one of three groups: (a) low intensity (90 minutes/session, 2 sessions/week 2 weeks) bilateral movement training coupled with active neuromuscular stimulation on the impaired wrist/fingers (b) high intensity (90 minutes/session, 4 sessions/week for 2 weeks) bilateral movement training coupled with active stimulation on the impaired wrist/finger extensors, and (c) control group (sham active stimulation). Patients' UE motor skills will be tested prior to therapy, within the first week after the therapy program and 2 months after treatment ends. "
A location was updated in Gainesville.
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The overall status was removed for Motor Behavior Laboratory, University of Florida.