Patient Targeted Upper Extremity Rehabilitation After Stroke "TARG"

Completed

Phase N/A Results N/A

Update History

25 Aug '17
The description was updated.
New
The overwhelming majority of individuals who survive stroke have persistent upper extremity (UE) motor deficits which interfere with re-engagement in meaningful activities. While advances from neuroscience are spurring development of new rehabilitation strategies, the development of novel measurement methods has not kept pace. Currently, there is no comprehensive measurement framework to objectively quantify impairment, match a rehabilitation therapy program to a patient's impairment level, and measure specific therapy effects. Therefore there has not been a rehabilitation trial where a measurement framework is the basis for designing the treatment as well as defining the outcome. The investigators redesigned the Fugl-Meyer UE Assessment (FMA-UE) using item response theory Rasch analysis and developed a first of its kind measurement framework that locates a patient along a continuum of impairment and directs a personalized therapy program tailored to patients' specific impairments and ability levels. The purpose of this proposed research is to empirically test this framework. The objective of this project is to empirically test the FMA-UE measurement framework. This study hypothesizes that therapeutic task practice at the just-right challenge of difficulty will maximize post-stroke motor skill reacquisition. It is expected that "targeted task-practice", will increase UE motor ability because task goal difficulty will be matched and systematically progressed according to patients' initial and evolving levels of ability. This is a single-blinded study with parallel arm design, stratified sampling and blocked randomization. 120 individuals with post-stroke UE hemiparesis will be enrolled; 40 participants per 3 UE impairment levels as defined by the investigators' measurement framework. Participants will engage in 12 sessions (3x/wk for 4 weeks, 2 hrs/session) of reach-to-grasp task-practice. Within each impairment level, subjects will be randomized to a treatment group; 20 to targeted task-practice and 20 to non-targeted task-practice. Targeted task-practice is personalized to patient-specific UE motor deficits with initial targets (goals) defined according to baseline measures and targets continually progressed after every 3 therapy sessions so that the goals match the patient's evolving level of ability. Non-targeted task practice is defined as a standard of care task-practice intervention intended to increase UE use but not alter specific impairments. Data analyses will include (1) ANOVA to test the effects of targeted vs. non-targeted therapy on UE motor ability, (2) multiple regression to model the relationship between therapy and movement adaptions occurring pre- to post-rehabilitation, and (3) growth mixture modeling to define responders and non-responders. This project is significant because there is a pressing need for a comprehensive measurement framework to guide novel interventions designed to improve post-stroke UE motor function and define their effects.
Old
The overwhelming majority of individuals who survive stroke have persistent upper extremity (UE) motor deficits which interfere with re-engagement in meaningful activities. While advances from neuroscience are spurring development of new rehabilitation strategies, the development of novel measurement methods has not kept pace. Currently, there is no comprehensive measurement framework to objectively quantify impairment, match a rehabilitation therapy program to a patient's impairment level, and measure specific therapy effects. Therefore there has not been a rehabilitation trial where a measurement framework is the basis for designing the treatment as well as defining the outcome. The investigators redesigned the Fugl-Meyer UE Assessment (FMA-UE) using item response theory Rasch analysis and developed a first of its kind measurement framework that locates a patient along a continuum of impairment and directs a personalized therapy program tailored to patients' specific impairments and ability levels. The purpose of this proposed research is to empirically test this framework. The objective of this project is to empirically test the FMA-UE measurement framework. This study hypothesizes that therapeutic task practice at the just-right challenge of difficulty will maximize post-stroke motor skill reacquisition. It is expected that "targeted task-practice", will increase UE motor ability because task goal difficulty will be matched and systematically progressed according to patients' initial and evolving levels of ability. This is a single-blinded study with parallel arm design, stratified sampling and blocked randomization. 120 individuals with post-stroke UE hemiparesis will be enrolled; 40 participants per 3 UE impairment levels as defined by the investigators' measurement framework. Participants will engage in 12 sessions (3x/wk for 4 weeks, 2 hrs/session) of reach-to-grasp task-practice. Within each impairment level, subjects will be randomized to a treatment group; 20 to targeted task-practice and 20 to non-targeted task-practice. Targeted task-practice is personalized to patient-specific UE motor deficits with initial targets (goals) defined according to baseline measures and targets continually progressed after every 3 therapy sessions so that the goals match the patient's evolving level of ability. Non-targeted task practice is defined as a standard of care task-practice intervention intended to increase UE use but not alter specific impairments. Data analyses will include (1) ANOVA to test the effects of targeted vs. non-targeted therapy on UE motor ability, (2) multiple regression to model the relationship between therapy and movement adaptions occurring pre- to post-rehabilitation, and (3) growth mixture modeling to define responders and non-responders. This project is significant because there is a pressing need for a comprehensive measurement framework to guide novel interventions designed to improve post-stroke UE motor function and define their effects.
The gender criteria for eligibility was updated to "All."
The eligibility criteria were updated.
New
Inclusion Criteria: Individuals are eligible for this study if they have: - experienced a stroke at least 3 months prior that has resulted in unilateral hemiparesis. - exhibit voluntarily paretic arm shoulder flexion 30 degrees with simultaneous elbow extension 20 degrees. - impairment with overhead reach and wrist circumduction and fine motor dexterity. - passive range of motion in affected shoulder, elbow and wrist within 20 degrees of normal values. Exclusion Criteria: Individuals are not eligible for this study if they have: - a lesion in the brainstem or cerebellum. - another neurological disease that may impair motor skills (e.g., Parkinson's Disease). - pain in the affected upper extremity that would limit participation in the study intervention. - difficulty understanding and following 3-step directions. - difficulty sitting independently without postural support. - an orthopedic condition or impaired corrected vision that alters the kinematics of reaching. - are unable to travel to and remain in Charleston SC for the duration of the 4-week study.
Old
Inclusion Criteria: Individuals are eligible for this study if they have: - experienced a stroke at least 3 months prior that has resulted in unilateral hemiparesis. - exhibit voluntarily paretic arm shoulder flexion 30 degrees with simultaneous elbow extension 20 degrees. - impairment with overhead reach and wrist circumduction and fine motor dexterity. - passive range of motion in affected shoulder, elbow and wrist within 20 degrees of normal values. Exclusion Criteria: Individuals are not eligible for this study if they have: - a lesion in the brainstem or cerebellum. - another neurological disease that may impair motor skills (e.g., Parkinson's Disease). - pain in the affected upper extremity that would limit participation in the study intervention. - difficulty understanding and following 3-step directions. - difficulty sitting independently without postural support. - an orthopedic condition or impaired corrected vision that alters the kinematics of reaching. - are unable to travel to and remain in Charleston SC for the duration of the 4-week study.
A location was updated in Charleston.
New
The overall status was removed for Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC.
2 Apr '16
The description was updated.
New
The overwhelming majority of individuals who survive stroke have persistent upper extremity (UE) motor deficits which interfere with re-engagement in meaningful activities. While advances from neuroscience are spurring development of new rehabilitation strategies, the development of novel measurement methods has not kept pace. Currently, there is no comprehensive measurement framework to objectively quantify impairment, match a rehabilitation therapy program to a patient's impairment level, and measure specific therapy effects. Therefore there has not been a rehabilitation trial where a measurement framework is the basis for designing the treatment as well as defining the outcome. The investigators redesigned the Fugl-Meyer UE Assessment (FMA-UE) using item response theory Rasch analysis and developed a first of its kind measurement framework that locates a patient along a continuum of impairment and directs a personalized therapy program tailored to patients' specific impairments and ability levels. The purpose of this proposed research is to empirically test this framework. The objective of this project is to empirically test the FMA-UE measurement framework. This study hypothesizes that therapeutic task practice at the just-right challenge of difficulty will maximize post-stroke motor skill reacquisition. It is expected that "targeted task-practice", will increase UE motor ability because task goal difficulty will be matched and systematically progressed according to patients' initial and evolving levels of ability. This is a single-blinded study with parallel arm design, stratified sampling and blocked randomization. 120 individuals with post-stroke UE hemiparesis will be enrolled; 40 participants per 3 UE impairment levels as defined by the investigators' measurement framework. Participants will engage in 12 sessions (3x/wk for 4 weeks, 2 hrs/session) of reach-to-grasp task-practice. Within each impairment level, subjects will be randomized to a treatment group; 20 to targeted task-practice and 20 to non-targeted task-practice. Targeted task-practice is personalized to patient-specific UE motor deficits with initial targets (goals) defined according to baseline measures and targets continually progressed after every 3 therapy sessions so that the goals match the patient's evolving level of ability. Non-targeted task practice is defined as a standard of care task-practice intervention intended to increase UE use but not alter specific impairments. Data analyses will include (1) ANOVA to test the effects of targeted vs. non-targeted therapy on UE motor ability, (2) multiple regression to model the relationship between therapy and movement adaptions occurring pre- to post-rehabilitation, and (3) growth mixture modeling to define responders and non-responders. This project is significant because there is a pressing need for a comprehensive measurement framework to guide novel interventions designed to improve post-stroke UE motor function and define their effects.
Old
The overwhelming majority of individuals who survive stroke have persistent upper extremity (UE) motor deficits which interfere with re-engagement in meaningful activities. While advances from neuroscience are spurring development of new rehabilitation strategies, the development of novel measurement methods has not kept pace. Currently, there is no comprehensive measurement framework to objectively quantify impairment, match a rehabilitation therapy program to a patient's impairment level, and measure specific therapy effects. Therefore there has not been a rehabilitation trial where a measurement framework is the basis for designing the treatment as well as defining the outcome. The investigators redesigned the Fugl-Meyer UE Assessment (FMA-UE) using item response theory Rasch analysis and developed a first of its kind measurement framework that locates a patient along a continuum of impairment and directs a personalized therapy program tailored to patients' specific impairments and ability levels. The purpose of this proposed research is to empirically test this framework. The objective of this project is to empirically test the FMA-UE measurement framework. This study hypothesizes that therapeutic task practice at the just-right challenge of difficulty will maximize post-stroke motor skill reacquisition. It is expected that "targeted task-practice", will increase UE motor ability because task goal difficulty will be matched and systematically progressed according to patients' initial and evolving levels of ability. This is a single-blinded study with parallel arm design, stratified sampling and blocked randomization. 120 individuals with post-stroke UE hemiparesis will be enrolled; 40 participants per 3 UE impairment levels as defined by our measurement framework. Participants will engage in 12 sessions (3x/wk for 4 weeks, 2 hrs/session) of reach-to-grasp task-practice. Within each impairment level, subjects will be randomized to a treatment group; 20 to targeted task-practice and 20 to non-targeted task-practice. Targeted task-practice is personalized to patient-specific UE motor deficits with initial targets (goals) defined according to baseline measures and targets continually progressed after every 3 therapy sessions so that the goals match the patient's evolving level of ability. Non-targeted task practice is defined as a standard of care task-practice intervention intended to increase UE use but not alter specific impairments. Data analyses will include (1) ANOVA to test the effects of targeted vs. non-targeted therapy on UE motor ability, (2) multiple regression to model the relationship between therapy and movement adaptions occurring pre- to post-rehabilitation, and (3) growth mixture modeling to define responders and non-responders. This project is significant because there is a pressing need for a comprehensive measurement framework to guide novel interventions designed to improve post-stroke UE motor function and define their effects.
30 Oct '15
The eligibility criteria were updated.
New
Inclusion Criteria: Individuals are eligible for this study if they have: - experienced a stroke at least 3 months prior that has resulted in unilateral hemiparesis. - exhibit voluntarily paretic arm shoulder flexion 30 degrees with simultaneous elbow extension 20 degrees. - impairment with overhead reach and wrist circumduction and fine motor dexterity. - passive range of motion in affected shoulder, elbow and wrist within 20 degrees of normal values. Exclusion Criteria: Individuals are not eligible for this study if they have: - a lesion in the brainstem or cerebellum. - another neurological disease that may impair motor skills (e.g., Parkinson's Disease). - pain in the affected upper extremity that would limit participation in the study intervention. - difficulty understanding and following 3-step directions. - difficulty sitting independently without postural support. - an orthopedic condition or impaired corrected vision that alters the kinematics of reaching. - are unable to travel to and remain in Charleston SC for the duration of the 4-week study.
Old
Inclusion Criteria: Individuals are eligible for this study if they have: - experienced unilateral hemispheric ischemic stroke at least 3 months but no more than 7 years prior. - exhibit voluntarily paretic arm shoulder flexion 30 degrees with simultaneous elbow extension 20 degrees. - impairment with overhead reach and wrist circumduction and fine motor dexterity. - passive range of motion in affected shoulder, elbow and wrist within 20 degrees of normal values. Exclusion Criteria: Individuals are not eligible for this study if they have: - a lesion in the brainstem or cerebellum. - another neurological disease that may impair motor skills (e.g., Parkinson's Disease). - pain in the affected shoulder, elbow or wrist that interferes with movement. - difficulty understanding and following 3-step directions. - difficulty sitting independently without postural support. - an orthopedic condition or impaired corrected vision that alters the kinematics of reaching. - are unable to travel to and remain in Charleston SC for the duration of the 4-week study.
14 Jun '14
The eligibility criteria were updated.
New
Inclusion Criteria: Individuals are eligible for this study if they have: - experienced unilateral hemispheric ischemic stroke at least 3 months but no more than 7 years prior. - exhibit voluntarily paretic arm shoulder flexion 30 degrees with simultaneous elbow extension 20 degrees. - impairment with overhead reach and wrist circumduction and fine motor dexterity. - passive range of motion in affected shoulder, elbow and wrist within 20 degrees of normal values. Exclusion Criteria: Individuals are not eligible for this study if they have: - a lesion in the brainstem or cerebellum. - another neurological disease that may impair motor skills (e.g., Parkinson's Disease). - pain in the affected shoulder, elbow or wrist that interferes with movement. - difficulty understanding and following 3-step directions. - difficulty sitting independently without postural support. - an orthopedic condition or impaired corrected vision that alters the kinematics of reaching. - are unable to travel to and remain in Charleston SC for the duration of the 4-week study.
Old
Inclusion Criteria: Individuals are eligible for this study if they have: - experienced unilateral hemispheric ischemic stroke at least 6 months but no more than 7 years prior. - exhibit voluntarily paretic arm shoulder flexion 30 degrees with simultaneous elbow extension 20 degrees. - impairment with overhead reach and wrist circumduction and fine motor dexterity. - passive range of motion in affected shoulder, elbow and wrist within 20 degrees of normal values. Exclusion Criteria: Individuals are not eligible for this study if they have: - a lesion in the brainstem or cerebellum. - another neurological disease that may impair motor skills (e.g., Parkinson's Disease). - pain in the affected shoulder, elbow or wrist that interferes with movement. - difficulty understanding and following 3-step directions. - difficulty sitting independently without postural support. - an orthopedic condition or impaired corrected vision that alters the kinematics of reaching. - are unable to travel to and remain in Charleston SC for the duration of the 4-week study.
12 Sep '13
Trial acronym was updated.
New
TARG
The eligibility criteria were updated.
New
Inclusion Criteria: Individuals are eligible for this study if they have: - experienced unilateral hemispheric ischemic stroke at least 6 months but no more than 7 years prior. - exhibit voluntarily paretic arm shoulder flexion 30 degrees with simultaneous elbow extension 20 degrees. - impairment with overhead reach and wrist circumduction and fine motor dexterity. - passive range of motion in affected shoulder, elbow and wrist within 20 degrees of normal values. Exclusion Criteria: Individuals are not eligible for this study if they have: - a lesion in the brainstem or cerebellum. - another neurological disease that may impair motor skills (e.g., Parkinson's Disease). - pain in the affected shoulder, elbow or wrist that interferes with movement. - difficulty understanding and following 3-step directions. - difficulty sitting independently without postural support. - an orthopedic condition or impaired corrected vision that alters the kinematics of reaching. - are unable to travel to and remain in Charleston SC for the duration of the 4-week study.
Old
Inclusion Criteria: Individuals are eligible for this study if they have: 1. experienced unilateral hemispheric ischemic stroke at least 6 months but no more than 7 years prior. 2. exhibit voluntarily paretic arm shoulder flexion 30 degrees with simultaneous elbow extension 20 degrees. 3. impairment with overhead reach and wrist circumduction and fine motor dexterity. 4. passive range of motion in affected shoulder, elbow and wrist within 20 degrees of normal values. Exclusion Criteria: Individuals are not eligible for this study if they have: 1. a lesion in the brainstem or cerebellum. 2. another neurological disease that may impair motor skills (e.g., Parkinson's Disease). 3. pain in the affected shoulder, elbow or wrist that interferes with movement. 4. difficulty understanding and following 3-step directions. 5. difficulty sitting independently without postural support. 6. an orthopedic condition or impaired corrected vision that alters the kinematics of reaching. 7. are unable to travel to and remain in Charleston SC for the duration of the 4-week study.