Modulation of Brain Plasticity After Perinatal Stroke "PLASTIC CHAMPS"

Active, not recruiting

Phase 2/3 Results N/A

Update History

24 Oct '13
A location was updated in Calgary.
New
The overall status was removed for Alberta Childrens Hospital.
6 Oct '11
The description was updated.
New
Perinatal stroke is the leading cause of the most common term-born cerebral palsy: hemiplegic CP (HCP). With morbidity spanning all aspects of a child's life and lasting for decades, global impact is large. Mechanisms are poorly understood and prevention strategies remain elusive. Treatments are limited, leading to loss of hope in children and families that merits exploration of new interventions. Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) may benefit but proper clinical trials are required. The investigators clinical-radiographic classifications have established perinatal stroke syndromes correlating with neurological outcome. Most common are: (1) arterial ischemic stroke of the middle cerebral artery (AIS-MCA) featuring cortical and subcortical damage acquired at birth and (2) periventricular venous infarction (PVI), a novel subcortical injury acquired in utero. These syndromes differ in the essential variables for plastic organization after perinatal injury: location and timing. In addition, recent animal and human studies suggest they may share a similar maladaptive plasticity whereby motor control of the weak side is "installed" in the non-lesioned hemisphere during development. Despite the ideal plasticity model such focal injury in a young brain provides, studies have been limited and suffer from small numbers of older patients with heterogeneous lesions. The value of studying plastic organization will be realized upon translation into meaningful patient benefits. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) offers non-invasive measurement of the neurophysiological brain properties underlying neuroplasticity. Repetitive TMS (rTMS) may modulate such systems with therapeutic effect. the investigators recently demonstrated the ability of rTMS to improve motor function in children with chronic stroke. Advances in perinatal brain injury and neurodevelopment are, for the first time, affording novel windows of opportunity for interventions to direct plastic organization toward better outcomes. Via the Alberta Perinatal Stroke Project (APSP), the investigators propose a clinical trial of two interventions to improve function in HCP while measuring the fundamental neurophysiological properties at play. Aim 1. Determine if rTMS and CIMT can improve motor function in HCP. Hypothesis: Two weeks of daily rTMS improves motor function at 30 days. Aim 2. Define the neurophysiology of motor organization in strokeā€induced HCP at baseline and following rTMS and CIMT. Hypothesis: rTMS and CIMT reduce excitability of the non-lesioned motor cortex. Population-based studies through the Alberta Perinatal Stroke Project (APSP) are establishing the largest perinatal stroke cohort to date. The investigators will complete a factorial 2 x 2 randomized clinical trial to determine the ability of daily rTMS and CIMT to improve motor function in children with HCP. Families will attend a child-centered, custom-designed intensive motor learning rehabilitation program (KidsCan Power Camp) for 2 weeks. Outcomes include validated measures of motor function and CP quality of life. The investigators will simultaneously measure the neurophysiology of plastic organization using TMS including cortical excitability, interhemispheric inhibition, and short interval intracortical inhibition. Baseline measures will define organization patterns while post-interventional measurement will evaluate the neurophysiological effects of rTMS and CIMT. Four groups of 16 children each (n=64) will be studied over 24 months with interim safety analysis after 10 and 32 patients. Successful completion is assured by principle investigator experience in perinatal stroke and TMS and the collaborative support of world leaders in pediatric and adult stroke, TMS, basic neuroscience, and physiatry/rehabilitation. Understanding perinatal stroke plasticity and discovering methods to modulate it toward better outcomes carries a large impact, greatest for children with CP and their families.
Old
Perinatal stroke is the leading cause of the most common term-born cerebral palsy: hemiplegic CP (HCP). With morbidity spanning all aspects of a child's life and lasting for decades, global impact is large. Mechanisms are poorly understood and prevention strategies remain elusive. Treatments are limited, leading to loss of hope in children and families that merits exploration of new interventions. Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) may benefit but proper clinical trials are required. The investigators clinical-radiographic classifications have established perinatal stroke syndromes correlating with neurological outcome. Most common are: (1) arterial ischemic stroke of the middle cerebral artery (AIS-MCA) featuring cortical and subcortical damage acquired at birth and (2) periventricular venous infarction (PVI), a novel subcortical injury acquired in utero. These syndromes differ in the essential variables for plastic organization after perinatal injury: location and timing. In addition, recent animal and human studies suggest they may share a similar maladaptive plasticity whereby motor control of the weak side is "installed" in the non-lesioned hemisphere during development. Despite the ideal plasticity model such focal injury in a young brain provides, studies have been limited and suffer from small numbers of older patients with heterogeneous lesions. The value of studying plastic organization will be realized upon translation into meaningful patient benefits. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) offers non-invasive measurement of the neurophysiological brain properties underlying neuroplasticity. Repetitive TMS (rTMS) may modulate such systems with therapeutic effect. the investigators recently demonstrated the ability of rTMS to improve motor function in children with chronic stroke. Advances in perinatal brain injury and neurodevelopment are, for the first time, affording novel windows of opportunity for interventions to direct plastic organization toward better outcomes. Via the Alberta Perinatal Stroke Project (APSP), the investigators propose a clinical trial of two interventions to improve function in HCP while measuring the fundamental neurophysiological properties at play. Aim 1. Determine if rTMS and CIMT can improve motor function in HCP. Hypothesis: Two weeks of daily rTMS improves motor function at 30 days. Aim 2. Define the neurophysiology of motor organization in stroke?induced HCP at baseline and following rTMS and CIMT. Hypothesis: rTMS and CIMT reduce excitability of the non-lesioned motor cortex. Population-based studies through the Alberta Perinatal Stroke Project (APSP) are establishing the largest perinatal stroke cohort to date. The investigators will complete a factorial 2 x 2 randomized clinical trial to determine the ability of daily rTMS and CIMT to improve motor function in children with HCP. Families will attend a child-centered, custom-designed intensive motor learning rehabilitation program (KidsCan Power Camp) for 2 weeks. Outcomes include validated measures of motor function and CP quality of life. The investigators will simultaneously measure the neurophysiology of plastic organization using TMS including cortical excitability, interhemispheric inhibition, and short interval intracortical inhibition. Baseline measures will define organization patterns while post-interventional measurement will evaluate the neurophysiological effects of rTMS and CIMT. Four groups of 16 children each (n=64) will be studied over 24 months with interim safety analysis after 10 and 32 patients. Successful completion is assured by principle investigator experience in perinatal stroke and TMS and the collaborative support of world leaders in pediatric and adult stroke, TMS, basic neuroscience, and physiatry/rehabilitation. Understanding perinatal stroke plasticity and discovering methods to modulate it toward better outcomes carries a large impact, greatest for children with CP and their families.