Microelectrode Brain-Machine Interface for Individuals With Tetraplegia

Recruiting

Phase N/A Results N/A

Update History

19 Aug '17
The gender criteria for eligibility was updated to "All."
The eligibility criteria were updated.
New
Inclusion Criteria: - Limited or no ability to use both hands due to cervical spinal cord injury or brainstem or spinal stroke - At least 1 year post-injury - Live within 1 hour of the University of Pittsburgh and be willing to travel to the University of Pittsburgh once per week for BMI training - Additional inclusion criteria must also be reviewed Exclusion Criteria: - Certain implanted devices - Presence of other serious disease or disorder that could affect ability to participate in this study - Individuals who are immunosuppressed or who have conditions that typically result in immunocompromise - Additional exclusion criteria must also be reviewed
Old
Inclusion Criteria: - Limited or no ability to use both hands due to cervical spinal cord injury or brainstem or spinal stroke - At least 1 year post-injury - Live within 1 hour of the University of Pittsburgh and be willing to travel to the University of Pittsburgh once per week for BMI training - Additional inclusion criteria must also be reviewed Exclusion Criteria: - Certain implanted devices - Presence of other serious disease or disorder that could affect ability to participate in this study - Individuals who are immunosuppressed or who have conditions that typically result in immunocompromise - Additional exclusion criteria must also be reviewed
16 Dec '15
The description was updated.
New
Individuals with tetraplegia (paralysis caused by illness or injury that results in partial or total loss of use of the arms and legs) have intact brain function but are unable to move due to injury or disease affecting the spinal cord, nerves or muscles. Brain-machine interface (BMI) technology is based on the finding that with intact brain function, neural signals are generated even though they are not sent to the arms, hands and legs. By implanting electrodes in the brain, individuals can be trained to send neural signals which are interpreted by a computer and translated to movement which can then be used to control a variety of devices or computer displays.
Old
Individuals with tetraplegia (paralysis caused by illness or injury that results in partial or total loss of use of the arms and legs) have intact brain function but are unable to move due to injury or disease affecting the spinal cord, nerves or muscles. Brain-machine interface (BMI) technology is based on the finding that with intact brain function, neural signals are generated even though they are not sent to the arms, hands and legs. By implanting electrodes in the brain, individuals can be trained to send neural signals which are interpreted by a computer and translated to movement which can then be used to control a variety of devices or computer displays.
6 Nov '13
A location was updated in Pittsburgh.
New
The overall status was updated to "Recruiting" at University of Pittsburgh.
20 Jun '13
A location was updated in Pittsburgh.
New
The overall status was updated to "Recruiting" at University of Pittsburgh.