Interaction Between Trunk and Gait Performance in Both Healthy Adults and Stroke Patients

Recruiting

Phase N/A Results N/A

Trial Description

The aim is to investigate the biomechanical interaction between trunk and gait performance in both healthy and stroke subjects. People after stroke often have an impaired trunk function, resulting in balance and gait disorders. Pathological movement patterns after stroke can be compared with normative data as motion capture systems provide more sensitive data to explore the interaction between trunk performance and gait in contrast to the clinical measures used in literature.

Detailed Description

Evidence has shown that trunk performance is related to measures of balance, gait and functional ability. Yet, several aspects of trunk performance such as sitting balance, trunk muscle strength, selective trunk movements and trunk position sense are impaired after stroke. This implies that impaired trunk performance will inevitably lead to impaired postural control during activities performed while standing and walking. Nonetheless, the interaction between increased trunk performance and improvements in activities performed while standing and walking is not evident. It has previously been stated that therapy primarily induces treatment effects on the abilities at which training is specifically aimed. However, previous research has shown that additional trunk exercises improve not only trunk performance but also standing balance and mobility. Yet, the clinical outcome measures used in previous studies are not suitable to explore the relationship between trunk and gait performance and cannot explain the underlying mechanisms of the therapeutic effects. Since studies using sensitive motion analyses to investigate trunk biomechanics during gait are sparse in both healthy subjects and subjects with stroke. Data will be gathered by a Vicon analysis system (©Vicon Motion Systems Ltd., London, UK) with a measuring frequency of 100 Hz and eight infrared automated cameras (Vicon T10 cameras, 100 fps, 1 Megapixel) measured the 3D coordinates of the reflective markers. In addition, initial contact and toe off were defined based on the ankle trajectories of the reflective markers together with 3 AMTI type OR 6-7 force plates (1000 fps, 46x50x8 cm) and 1 AccuGait® (1000 fps) force plate recordings. Reflective motion trackers were attached to anatomical landmarks on the participant's body according to the standard Plug-In-Gait model. Furthermore, a 16 channel telemetric wireless EMG system (Arion Zerowire) will measure muscle activity.

Conditions

Trial Population

Healthy Volunteers: community sample Stroke: Rehabilitation Hospital RevArte, primary care clinic

Outcomes

Type Measure Time Frame Safety Issue
Primary Continous relative phase (of the trunk) by means of 3D full body gait analysis Once, in the week of inclusion
Secondary Lateral trunk displacements by means of 3D full body gait analysis (mm) Once, in the week of inclusion
Secondary Vertical trunk displacements by means of 3D full body gait analysis (mm) Once, in the week of inclusion
Secondary Anteroposterior trunk displacements by means of 3D full body gait analysis (mm) Once, in the week of inclusion

Sponsors