Identifying Genes That May Increase the Risk for Heart Disease in African Americans

Completed

Phase N/A Results N/A

Trial Description

Heart disease and stroke disproportionately affect African Americans in the United States. These conditions are likely caused by both environmental and genetic factors. This study will attempt to identify specific genes of African and European ancestral origins that may influence the development of heart disease in African Americans.

Detailed Description

African Americans have a high risk of developing heart disease and stroke, and are more likely to die from heart-related illnesses than other racial and ethnic groups. A large majority of African Americans are descendants of both African and European ancestors who mixed five to six generations ago. Because only a few generations have passed since that time, it is still possible to identify specific genes, the basic units of heredity, as being either African or European in origin. This is a sub study of the Jackson Heart Study, which is examining the environmental and genetic factors that influence the development of heart disease in African Americans. In this study, researchers will examine genes from participants in the Jackson Heart Study to identify specific African and European genes that influence the development of heart disease in African American men and women.
This study will use genetic samples from individuals participating in the Jackson Heart Study. There will be no study visits for participants. Study researchers will examine the genetic samples and identify specific African and European genes that may influence the development of heart disease, high blood pressure, lipid disorders, left ventricular hypertrophy, and low birth weight.

Conditions

Trial Design

  • Observation: Natural History
  • Perspective: Prospective

Outcomes

Type Measure Time Frame Safety Issue
No outcomes associated with this trial.

Sponsors