Home-based Non-invasive Brain Stimulation and Hand Tracking Rehabilitation for People With Chronic Stroke

Completed

Phase N/A Results N/A

Update History

27 Oct '17
The Summary of Purpose was updated.
New
This study assesses telerehabilitation in people with chronic stroke using a combination of noninvasive brain stimulation and finger tracking training. Telerehabilitation allows patients to train in their own home which also allows for longer training periods than what is currently allowed clinically. Noninvasive transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) uses two surface electrodes connected to a small battery that will be attached to the head. This will be used to modulate neuronal excitability. With sensors attached to fingers and the wrist, the patient will move the joints to track a target displayed on a screen. The combined treatment will be applied in two experiments. The first will be on 3 patients coming to our lab and the second on 3 patients in their home, both under supervision. We will integrate the two components and test the resulting and novel treatment system for technical feasibility and safety, which will set the stage for future efficacy studies under federal grant support. We hypothesize that the developed system will be safe and feasible.
Old
This study assesses telerehabilitation in people with chronic stroke using a combination of noninvasive brain stimulation and finger tracking training. Telerehabilitation allows patients to train in their own home which also allows for longer training periods than what is currently allowed clinically. Noninvasive transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) uses two surface electrodes connected to a small battery that will be attached to the head. This will be used to modulate neuronal excitability. With sensors attached to fingers and the wrist, the patient will move the joints to track a target displayed on a screen. The combined treatment will be applied in two experiments. The first will be on 3 patients coming to our lab and the second on 3 patients in their home, both under supervision. We will integrate the two components and test the resulting and novel treatment system for technical feasibility and safety, which will set the stage for future efficacy studies under federal grant support. We hypothesize that the developed system will be safe and feasible.
The description was updated.
New
This study will assess the safety and feasibility of a telerehabilitation protocol involving non-invasive brain stimulation. Therefore, the two arms of the study are 1) implementation of this protocol in a controlled laboratory setting and 2) implementation of this protocol in a patient's home, being set up by the patient but controlled remotely using a blue-tooth system by an investigator in a different location. The two arms of this study will occur successively with the first arm being completed with three patients followed by the second arm being completed with a second group of three patients.
Old
This study will assess the safety and feasibility of a telerehabilitation protocol involving non-invasive brain stimulation. Therefore, the two arms of the study are 1) implementation of this protocol in a controlled laboratory setting and 2) implementation of this protocol in a patient's home, being set up by the patient but controlled remotely using a blue-tooth system by an investigator in a different location. The two arms of this study will occur successively with the first arm being completed with three patients followed by the second arm being completed with a second group of three patients.
The gender criteria for eligibility was updated to "All."
A location was updated in Minneapolis.
New
The overall status was removed for University of Minnesota.
6 Dec '15
The Summary of Purpose was updated.
New
This study assesses telerehabilitation in people with chronic stroke using a combination of noninvasive brain stimulation and finger tracking training. Telerehabilitation allows patients to train in their own home which also allows for longer training periods than what is currently allowed clinically. Noninvasive transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) uses two surface electrodes connected to a small battery that will be attached to the head. This will be used to modulate neuronal excitability. With sensors attached to fingers and the wrist, the patient will move the joints to track a target displayed on a screen. The combined treatment will be applied in two experiments. The first will be on 3 patients coming to our lab and the second on 3 patients in their home, both under supervision. We will integrate the two components and test the resulting and novel treatment system for technical feasibility and safety, which will set the stage for future efficacy studies under federal grant support. We hypothesize that the developed system will be safe and feasible.
Old
This study assesses telerehabilitation in people with chronic stroke using a combination of noninvasive brain stimulation and finger tracking training. Telerehabilitation allows patients to train in their own home which also allows for longer training periods than what is currently allowed clinically. Noninvasive transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) uses two surface electrodes connected to a small battery that will be attached to the head. This will be used to modulate neuronal excitability. With sensors attached to fingers and the wrist, the patient will move the joints to track a target displayed on a screen. The combined treatment will be applied in two experiments. The first will be on 3 patients coming to our lab and the second on 3 patients in their home, both under supervision. We will integrate the two components and test the resulting and novel treatment system for technical feasibility and safety, which will set the stage for future efficacy studies under federal grant support. We hypothesize that the developed system will be safe and feasible.
A location was updated in Minneapolis.
New
The overall status was removed for University of Minnesota.