High Intensity Interval Training in Chronic Stroke "HIT"

Completed

Phase N/A Results N/A

Trial Description

The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of high intensity interval training (HIT) and traditional aerobic training for persons with stroke.

Detailed Description

Participants were randomized to either HIT or traditional aerobic training; each 25 minutes, 3 times per week for 4 weeks. Outcomes were measured before and after training by a blinded rater.

Conditions

Interventions

  • High-intensity interval training (HIT) Other
    Intervention Desc: Treadmill exercise using bursts of concentrated effort alternated with recovery periods
    ARM 1: Kind: Experimental
    Label: High-intensity interval training (HIT)
    Description: Treadmill exercise using bursts of concentrated effort alternated with recovery periods
  • Traditional Aerobic Training Other
    Intervention Desc: Moderate intensity continuous aerobic exercise on a treadmill
    ARM 1: Kind: Experimental
    Label: Traditional aerobic training
    Description: Moderate intensity continuous aerobic exercise on a treadmill

Trial Design

  • Allocation: Randomized
  • Masking: Single Blind (Outcomes Assessor)
  • Purpose: Treatment
  • Endpoint: Efficacy Study
  • Intervention: Parallel Assignment

Outcomes

Type Measure Time Frame Safety Issue
Primary Change in peak aerobic capacity (VO2-peak) Baseline and 4 weeks No
Secondary Change in gait velocity (10 meter walk test) Baseline and 4 weeks No
Secondary Change in 6-Minute Walk Test Baseline and 4 weeks No
Secondary Change in daily physical activity (Activity Monitor) Baseline and 4 weeks No
Secondary Change in gait economy (mean oxygen uptake at comfortable walking speed) Baseline and 4 weeks No
Secondary Change in Stroke Impact Scale Baseline and 4 weeks No
Secondary Change in submaximal aerobic capacity (VO2 at ventilatory threshold) Baseline and 4 weeks No
Secondary Change in fastest treadmill speed (steep ramp test) Baseline and 4 weeks No
Secondary Change in fractional utilization Baseline and 4 weeks No

Sponsors