Forearm Rotation Orthosis for Stroke

Active, not recruiting

Phase N/A Results N/A

Update History

14 Feb '18
The description was updated.
New
Persons with central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction often have difficulty incorporating their affected limb effectively and efficiently into functional tasks due to muscle weakness and/or spasticity. This may further interfere with their performance of everyday activities and restrict life roles. Traditional rehabilitation interventions emphasize spasticity reduction. However, active movement and muscle strength of forearm supination are found strongly related to motor function, rather than spasticity. In contrast, task-oriented movement training trials have demonstrated promising evidence that persons with CNS dysfunction benefit from the training in improvement of motor function and increase functional use of the affected limb. Orthotic intervention is one therapeutic option for this population. Most orthotic designs for this population are static, developed for sympton reduction or deformity prevention, and aimed at the wrist and hand. However, its effects on spasticity reduction remain controversial. Given that static orthotics may interfere with functional performance and further develop the learned nonuse of the affected limb, a dynamic or mobilization orthosis would be appropriate for enhancing functional performance. Moreover, an orthosis that assists forearm rotation is speculated to enhance functional performance. This study will examine the efficacy of a forearm rotation orthosis combined with the occupational therapy task-oriented approach on functional performance for persons with a hemiparetic arm.
Old
Persons with central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction often have difficulty incorporating their affected limb effectively and efficiently into functional tasks due to muscle weakness and/or spasticity. This may further interfere with their performance of everyday activities and restrict life roles. Traditional rehabilitation interventions emphasize spasticity reduction. However, active movement and muscle strength of forearm supination are found strongly related to motor function, rather than spasticity. In contrast, task-oriented movement training trials have demonstrated promising evidence that persons with CNS dysfunction benefit from the training in improvement of motor function and increase functional use of the affected limb. Orthotic intervention is one therapeutic option for this population. Most orthotic designs for this population are static, developed for sympton reduction or deformity prevention, and aimed at the wrist and hand. However, its effects on spasticity reduction remain controversial. Given that static orthotics may interfere with functional performance and further develop the learned nonuse of the affected limb, a dynamic or mobilization orthosis would be appropriate for enhancing functional performance. Moreover, an orthosis that assists forearm rotation is speculated to enhance functional performance. This study will examine the efficacy of a forearm rotation orthosis combined with the occupational therapy task-oriented approach on functional performance for persons with a hemiparetic arm.
The eligibility criteria were updated.
New
Inclusion Criteria: - Have a diagnosis of stroke for at least three months - Be 18 years of age or older - Have sufficient cognitive function to follow three-step verbal instruction and provide independent consent - Have appropriate trunk and lower extremity function that does not interfere with performance of the upper extremity - Have at least minimum voluntary movement in the upper extremity (10 degrees of shoulder flex/ abduction, 10 degrees of elbow flexion/extension) - Not receive any rehabilitative interventions concurrent with the study Exclusion Criteria: - Severe joint deformities or contractures of the affected upper extremity that limit range of motion required for functional tasks - Capability of voluntarily extending the wrist and fingers through the full range - Other rehabilitation interventions concurrent with the study - Have serious uncontrolled medical problems, such as seizures and visual impairment
Old
Inclusion Criteria: - Have a diagnosis of stroke for at least three months - Be 18 years of age or older - Have sufficient cognitive function to follow three-step verbal instruction and provide independent consent - Have appropriate trunk and lower extremity function that does not interfere with performance of the upper extremity - Have at least minimum voluntary movement in the upper extremity (10 degrees of shoulder flex/ abduction, 10 degrees of elbow flexion/extension) - Not receive any rehabilitative interventions concurrent with the study Exclusion Criteria: - Severe joint deformities or contractures of the affected upper extremity that limit range of motion required for functional tasks - Capability of voluntarily extending the wrist and fingers through the full range - Other rehabilitation interventions concurrent with the study - Have serious uncontrolled medical problems, such as seizures and visual impairment
A location was updated in Minneapolis.
New
The overall status was removed for Children's Rehabilitation Building, University of Minnesota.
3 Jun '17
Trial was updated to "N/A."
The gender criteria for eligibility was updated to "All."
23 Sep '14
A location was updated in Minneapolis.
New
The overall status was removed for Sister Kenny Rehabilitation Institute: Research Center.