Evaluation of Early Standardized Task-Specific Training (ESTT) "ESTT"

Terminated

Phase N/A Results

Update History

6 Oct '15
The Summary of Purpose was updated.
New
A. Specific Aims: 1. There is one specific aim of this study. The aim is to evaluate the effectiveness of early standardized task-specific training (ESTT) in persons with acute stroke. B. Hypothesis: 1. It is our hypothesis that subjects who receive ESTT will walk faster and more symmetrically than published reports of gait outcomes in persons with stroke.
Old
A. Specific Aims: 1. There is one specific aim of this study. The aim is to evaluate the effectiveness of early standardized task-specific training (ESTT) in persons with acute stroke. B. Hypothesis: 1. It is our hypothesis that subjects who receive ESTT will walk faster and more symmetrically than published reports of gait outcomes in persons with stroke.
3 Jun '15
A location was updated in Austin.
New
The overall status was removed for St. David's Rehabilitation Hospital.
A location was updated in Dallas.
New
The overall status was removed for Baylor Institute for Rehabilitation - Dallas.
A location was updated in Dallas.
New
The overall status was removed for Baylor Institute for Rehabilitation - Northwest.
A location was updated in Frisco.
New
The overall status was removed for Baylor Institute for Rehabilitation - Frisco.
12 Jul '13
The eligibility criteria were updated.
New
Inclusion Criteria: - Recent stroke (less than 6 weeks) - Able to give conformed consent or have family member who can give consent - first time stroke OR complete recovery from prior stroke Exclusion Criteria: - non-ambulatory before onset of stroke - bilateral stroke - presence of severe cardiac problems - other co-morbidities which would affect gait training (i.e. amputation, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, etc.) - recent myocardial infarct (within 4 weeks) - any uncontrolled health condition for which exercise is contraindicated - severe lower extremity joint disease/pathology that would interfere with gait training - subjects with BMI greater than 40 - significant cognitive impairment - age greater than 80 years or less than 16 years - able to complete 5 or more full heel raises with the affected ankle in standing with the knee extended with no more than one or two fingers on support surface for balance
Old
Inclusion Criteria: - Recent stroke(less than 4 weeks) - Able to give conformed consent or have family member who can give consent - first time stroke OR complete recovery from prior stroke Exclusion Criteria: - non-ambulatory before onset of stroke - bilateral stroke - presence of severe cardiac problems - other co-morbidities which would affect gait training (i.e. amputation, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, etc.) - recent myocardial infarct (within 4 weeks) - any uncontrolled health condition for which exercise is contraindicated - severe lower extremity joint disease/pathology that would interfere with gait training - subjects with BMI greater than 40 - significant cognitive impairment - age greater than 80 years or less than 16 years - able to complete 5 or more full heel raises with the affected ankle in standing with the knee extended with no more than one or two fingers on support surface for balance
7 Feb '13
Trial name was updated.
New
Evaluation of Early Standardized Task-Specific Training (ESTT)
The Summary of Purpose was updated.
New
A. Specific Aims: 1. There is one specific aim of this study. The aim is to evaluate the effectiveness of early standardized task-specific training (ESTT) in persons with acute stroke. B. Hypothesis: 1. It is our hypothesis that subjects who receive ESTT will walk faster and more symmetrically than published reports of gait outcomes in persons with stroke.
Old
A. Specific Aims: 1. There is one specific aim of this study. The aim is to compare the effectiveness of traditional gait training methods to early standardized task-specific training in persons with acute stroke. This will be done by comparing outcomes from two groups of persons receiving rehabilitation after a stroke. Group B will consist of persons that receive Early Standardized Task-Specific Training (ESTT) after acute stroke. Group A will be made up of persons that receive traditional therapy. B. Hypothesis: 1. It is our hypothesis that subjects in the experimental group, Group B, will demonstrate more symmetrical and faster gait 6 months after discharge from inpatient rehabilitation than subjects with stroke who have not received ESTT during the acute phase of recovery, i.e. subjects in Group A.
The description was updated.
New
It is our contention that gait recovery after stroke is impacted by the interventions that are acutely utilized during training. There is not a consensus about how to most effectively train individuals after stroke. It is clear, however, that most persons are left with significant and often debilitating gait dysfunction after stroke so there is an urgent need to find more effective therapeutic methods.
Old
It is our contention that gait recovery after stroke is impacted by the interventions that are acutely utilized during training. There is not a consensus about how to most effectively train individuals after stroke. It is clear, however, that most persons are left with significant and often debilitating gait dysfunction after stroke so there is an urgent need to find more effective therapeutic methods. There is one specific aim of this study. The aim is to compare the effectiveness of traditional gait training methods to early standardized task-specific training in persons with acute stroke.
The eligibility criteria were updated.
New
Inclusion Criteria: - Recent stroke(less than 4 weeks) - Able to give conformed consent or have family member who can give consent - first time stroke OR complete recovery from prior stroke Exclusion Criteria: - non-ambulatory before onset of stroke - bilateral stroke - presence of severe cardiac problems - other co-morbidities which would affect gait training (i.e. amputation, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, etc.) - recent myocardial infarct (within 4 weeks) - any uncontrolled health condition for which exercise is contraindicated - severe lower extremity joint disease/pathology that would interfere with gait training - subjects with BMI greater than 40 - significant cognitive impairment - age greater than 80 years or less than 16 years - able to complete 5 or more full heel raises with the affected ankle in standing with the knee extended with no more than one or two fingers on support surface for balance
Old
Inclusion Criteria: - Recent CVA (less than 4 weeks) - Able to give conformed consent or have family member who can give consent - first time stroke OR complete recovery from prior stroke Exclusion Criteria: - non-ambulatory before onset of stroke - bilateral stroke - presence of severe cardiac problems - other co-morbidities which would affect gait training (i.e. amputation, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury, etc.) - recent myocardial infarct (within 4 weeks) - any uncontrolled health condition for which exercise is contraindicated - severe lower extremity joint disease/pathology that would interfere with gait training - subjects with BMI greater than 40 - significant cognitive impairment - age greater than 80 years or less than 16 years - able to complete 5 or more full heel raises with the affected ankle in standing with the knee extended with no more than one or two fingers on support surface for balance