Does Splinting Prevent Contractures Following Stroke?

Completed

Phase N/A Results N/A

Trial Description

After a stroke, many people develop contracture of the muscles in their affected wrist and hand which leads to a permanently clenched, painful hand. A contracture is often treated by therapists who use hand splinting to prevent it occurring or slow down its progression. Despite their wide use, there has not been research completed to investigate whether or not splinting prevents contracture in people following stroke. In fact, this project will be the first of its kind in the world and is therefore vital to stroke rehabilitation.
The study is a multi-centre, randomised controlled trial that will measure the effect of hand-splinting in two positions on the prevention of contracture, functional use of the hand, and quality of life.

Conditions

Interventions

Outcomes

Type Measure Time Frame Safety Issue
No outcomes associated with this trial.

Sponsors