Assessment and Management of Post-Stroke Spasticity With Botulinum Toxin-A

Completed

Phase N/A Results N/A

Update History

21 May '15
The Summary of Purpose was updated.
New
Within the first year after stroke, approximately 38% of stroke survivors experience an increased resistance to movement, also called spasticity. One type of treatment that is approved for stroke survivors in Canada that could reduce spasticity is the injection of Botulinum toxin (BTX) into the affected muscle. While BTX reduces spasticity, there is limited evidence to show that BTX administration leads to functional improvements. This may occur because the outcomes aren't sensitive enough to detect change, some people may have better responses to BTX, or because BTX hasn't been paired with the right exercises to improve function. The aims of this research are: i) to determine if there is a way of improving the markers that measure change in response to treatment; and ii) to identify the ideal type of exercise that should be paired with BTX to allow the drug to have it greatest effect. There are two primary research questions: a) What are the measures that will indicate whether a person with post-stroke spasticity will benefit from BTX therapy? It is hypothesized that EMG latency and amplitude, for those who best respond to BTX, will differ from those who demonstrate a weaker response to BTX; b)What is the ideal training approach for improving muscle function in stroke survivors receiving BTX injections? It is hypothesized that a training protocol that focuses on optimizing specific muscle activation patterns will demonstrate better outcomes than a training program designed to improve function.
Old
Within the first year after stroke, approximately 38% of stroke survivors experience an increased resistance to movement, also called spasticity. One type of treatment that is approved for stroke survivors in Canada that could reduce spasticity is the injection of Botulinum toxin (BTX) into the affected muscle. While BTX reduces spasticity, there is limited evidence to show that BTX administration leads to functional improvements. This may occur because the outcomes aren't sensitive enough to detect change, some people may have better responses to BTX, or because BTX hasn't been paired with the right exercises to improve function. The aims of this research are: i) to determine if there is a way of improving the markers that measure change in response to treatment; and ii) to identify the ideal type of exercise that should be paired with BTX to allow the drug to have it greatest effect. There are two primary research questions: a) What are the measures that will indicate whether a person with post-stroke spasticity will benefit from BTX therapy? It is hypothesized that electrophysiological measures for those who best respond to BTX will differ from those who demonstrate a weaker response to BTX; b)What is the ideal training approach for improving muscle function in stroke survivors receiving BTX injections? It is hypothesized that a training protocol that focuses on optimizing specific muscle activation patterns will demonstrate better outcomes than a training program designed to improve function.
8 Feb '14
A location was updated in Toronto.
New
The overall status was removed for Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre.